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Milan's So Critical So Fashion Shows Continued Growth & Success
Written by Laura Molteni - Sunday, 29 September 2013
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Dress “She is rainbow” designed by Giulia Sambinello
 

Now in its fourth edition, So Critical So Fashion surprised with an increase in beautiful and valued brands. This event (organized in Milan once a year in conjunction with the Fashion Week) dedicated to sustainable and ethical fashion is open to the public, but the press, many bloggers and buyers also flock the event to discover new talents.

The three-day event provided a venue where you could buy items produced by small tailors, bags supporting humanitarian projects, jewelry with elements of recycling, and more. Personally, I fell in love with a hat modeled on a wooden form, designed by a stylist (who has collaborated with Borsalino, Romeo Gigli, Yohji Yamamoto), made of velour felt. The felt is a natural material and very “classic” (top quality vintage hats are made of this), obtained through the same methods as sheep's wool. I couldn’t avoid going out with a shopping bag… and to add to the fun, I thoroughly enjoyed fine conversations with exhibitors who were more than willing to tell - and with great enthusiasm - the story of their collections.

There were approximately 50 brands showing. Here are five of my favorites:

 

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Feine Hüte hats made of recycled jute coffee sacks lined with textile production waste. The bags are selected because they must be of organic material: a European law in fact prohibits the use of “treated” jute for the garment industry.

 

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RaMaya Creations Do you think about those boxes of “junk” that you see in antique flea markets? Here, take the old watch dials, keys, chandelier crystals... add taste and creativity and you get some lovely, contemporary jewelry!

 

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Secrets des Filles was founded by two sisters from Treviso (a city in the northeast of the Italian peninsula) with a passion for the recovery of fabrics, lace and trimmings - especially items discovered in vintage markets in Paris. The clothes and jewelry are made by hand and designed to match the various models. The 2013 collection of Secrets des Filles was inspired by old Japanese kimonos and the 1940s.

 

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Silvia Massacesi - A project developed during university, which has now become reality. This young talent has already racked up awards and other accolades. Her bags are made of cork and recycled paper (suitably waterproofed). To reach the final product, perfect in aesthetic and durability, there have been many trials. The bags come with a shoulder strap and are easily folded for quick packing into a suitcase.

 

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Stone Addicted - Bijoux in Raku ceramics and recovered textiles. The Raku is a Japanese technique dating back to the sixteenth century. The ceramic objects are extracted from the oven while still hot, smoked with sawdust, leaves or sand and abruptly cooled in ice water. In this way you get that particular metallic/rippled effect on the surface.

 

**Leader Image:  Dress “She is rainbow” designed by Giulia Sambinello for the Fashion In Fiber Recovery project. Accademia delle Belle Arti di Brera, Milan. Scrap fabrics, hand sewn roses and corset printed in woodcut.

 

 

 

 

**Photos and text by Laura Molteni

Laura Molteni is a freelance Italian journalist, crossmedia web editor and photographer, specialized in design and eco-fashion/textile.
 Multifaceted, she’s fascinated by the project culture and by images (photography, illustrations, paintings...). Always looking around for novelties and talents, she never stops to get intrigued by all the things which surround her. 
 

 

 

 

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